Friday, December 09, 2016

These Artists Are Tackling Big Issues through Tiny Works of Art

Yesterday I linked you to a very cool article by Artsy's Alexxa Gotthardt on the Statue of Liberty's Brooklyn twin. Today I want to discuss another of Ms. Gotthardt's pieces, this one on the subject of artists working on small scales.
Santiago is one of a number of contemporary artists working on a very, very small scale. The choice may seem at odds with an art world that, in the past 20-odd years, has seen both the size and price of contemporary art balloon to epic proportions (Jeff Koons’s towering balloon dog and Carsten Höller’s suspended sculptural slide come to mind). But these creatives find they can communicate more effectively by tapping into the age-old allure of small, sometimes downright microscopic forms, which bear a shock value all their own.
I can think of at least a dozen DMV area artists who have been working on a small scale, some for at least a couple of decades, most notably Bridget Sue Lambert, whose work show a familial relationship to the work of the Laurie Simmons mentioned in the article. Also the work of Zofie Lang's narrative assemblages.


And, of course, at every Artomatic there are always at least 20-30 new Peeps Dioramas!


Read Gotthardt's article here.

Thursday, December 08, 2016

Washington City Paper's annual "People" issue

Guess who is in the Washington City Paper annual People issue?


http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/special-issues/article/20846183/the-people-issue-2016


If you know what it’s like to find yourself at the table or on the couch chatting with someone you find utterly fascinating, then you have some idea of our collective delight in producing this week’s paper. Settle in, because there’s a lot of great stuff to read here.
Our fourth annual People Issue is City Paper’s effort to introduce you to some of the city’s most interesting folks, some of whom we already know, others we wanted to get to know on your behalf. We called them up, asked them to meet us for a conversation, and simply recorded what they said. They were also kind enough to sit for photos with our staff photographer Darrow Montgomery, whose portraits offer another layer of insight into the personalities who animate the following pages.  

The interviews have been edited for space and clarity, but we tried to keep all the most enchanting pearls. We’ve got an 84-year-old who fronts a local house band, a marijuana edibles entrepreneur, a drag queen, a (hot) transportation bureaucrat, a used bookstore owner who keeps his treasures in a secondhand bank vault, and so much more. —Liz Garrigan

The Story behind the Statue of Liberty’s Lesser-Known Brooklyn Twin

The Statue of Liberty, as many of us know, was a gift from France to the United States. Erected in 1886, it was unveiled with fanfare to commemorate the 100th anniversary of U.S. emancipation from British rule in 1776. Since then, she’s become one of the most symbolically powerful statues the world has ever seen, inextricably linked with the country’s pledge of “liberty and justice for all.” The 151-foot-tall copper figure has also been a galvanizing emblem for immigrants the world over—a piece of art that symbolizes democracy and served to welcome those who arrived in the U.S. through New York’s Ellis Island, as they entered a new home they heard was filled with opportunities that had eluded them elsewhere. 
When Charles Higgins, an Irish immigrant turned prominent Brooklyn businessman, conceived of Minerva, he had Lady Liberty—and a statue’s power to bring awareness to history—in mind. At the time, in the early 1900s, Higgins lived not far from Brooklyn’s Battle Hill, the land on which the Battle of Brooklyn—the first and biggest Revolutionary War battle after the signing of the Declaration of Independence—took place in 1776.
Read this very cool piece by Alexxa Gotthardt here. 

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Opportunity for artists

Deadline: January 1, 2017


Equality Matters Conversations on Gender and Race Exhibition

Exhibition Dates: February 13 – 25, 2017. The exhibition will take place during second annual WWU’s Equality Matters-Conversations on Gender and Race Symposium, which takes place in February 2017. Artists are invited to submit art that explores their understanding on how issues of gender and race influence contemporary culture. 

Steps:

2.Fill out and mail/email the form along with your image submissions to nicole.petrescu@williamwoods.edu.

3.Call in, fax or mail your entry fee no later than January 1, 2017.

Eligibility: Open to artists and art students in the United States.

Media: Open to all traditional and non-traditional genre and media (2D, 3D, digital). -Artists are responsible for the delivery and the pick-up of the artwork according to the schedule.

*St.Louis artists, contact Nicole for special delivery arrangement

Gateway Arts District Open Studios this Saturday

Come see what they're up to at the Washington Glass School this Saturday! Part of the Gateway Arts District Open Studio. 

Go there first, then see all the other artists participating in the event. 







12-5pm Saturday December 10... start at 3700 Otis Street, Mt. Rainier, MD.

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

The 11th Street Bridge Park project

The 11th Street Bridge Park is a nonprofit project led by Building Bridges Across the River at THEARC based in Southeast D.C. Every dollar they spend comes from generous donations from corporations, foundations and individuals like you. Did you know that in addition to securing $45 million to build the Bridge Park, their team also annually raises:
  • $210,000 for the Anacostia River Festival
  • $1 million+ for the implementation of our Equitable Development Plan
  • $40,000 for urban farms working with local faith communities
  • $200,000+ for additional cultural programming like September’s Lantern Walk

The Bridge Park is positively impacting the community and creating opportunities for residents in so many different ways. We need YOU to be a part of it.  DONATE TODAY.

Monday, December 05, 2016

Heading back to the DMV


Flying on Facebook - a cartoon by F. Lennox Campello c.2009

Heading back home in a super early flight from Ft Lauderdale - another ABMB art week in the bag!

Sunday, December 04, 2016

Context, the last day

Today was probably the most crowded day at the Context Art Miami fair in Wynwood, and from the reports that I got throughout the day, it was also packed at Aqua and at Scope.

Over at Scope I worked a morning telephonic sale for Tim Tate for a major piece heading to a well-known collector in Naples, Florida.


In spite of the large crowds, and the hundreds and hundreds, and hundreds of photographs that people always take (of the art) at the art fairs, it was somewhat slower, as far as sales go, although Jodi Walsh did manage to place a large clay installation with a local collector in Miami.

Wall Installation by Jodi Walsh
As we were closing at 6PM, I did manage to sell a large drawing, which happens to be my latest piece; it's always great to close the fair with a last minute fair.

As we always do, we had strategically parked the van by the loading gate - this means getting to Wynwood at 7AM to find a parking spot, and then hanging around for 4 hours until the fair opens. But the huge payoff is that then we were out of there by 7:30PM!

From there we headed to Miami Beach to load Tim Tate's work that was featured at the Scope Art Fair.

That load out was another story - the way Scope is located right on the beach necessitates a complex chess games of vans and trucks, etc., all apparently requiring police escort into the sand. It also means that no one really gets to park close to the tent, which means that the artwork has to be schlepped one piece at the time on the sand, as no wheeled vehicle to carry multiple pieces can be used (because of the sand). Also, for some inexplicable reason, the Scope management doesn't allow hand-carrying of work via the tent's loading dock. This requires even longer treks in the sand, all resulting in a brutal load in/out procedure for those who hand-carry/drive their own art.

Lesson learned? If you do Scope, then it is imperative to use an art delivery service and pay them to deal with this nightmare.

In spite of all of this, and via the use of a couple of hired hands, there were four of us loading, and it took about two and a half hours... by 10:30PM we were heading to Little Havana, hoping to hit the sack for an early morning wake-up, as Audrey hits the road for the drive back to the DMV around 4:30AM and my flight departs around 6AM.

Another year, another big dance done!

Saturday, December 03, 2016

Context Saturday: Best day so far

We departed our beach hotel in Hollywood and will spend the next two nights in my cousin's fortress in Little Havana, as we have done for the last few years.

Different scent in the crowds at the Context Art Miami fair today; there are still loads of women as slim as rifles, and men in impossibly tight pants, but there are also a lot more folks at Context not to be seen, but to see the artwork.

Tim Vermeulen,me, Jodi Walsh and Georgia Nassikas
Saturday saw the sale of another Tim Vermeulen painting, two of my drawings, a major hook-up between Jodi Walsh and a NYC design firm, and Audrey Wilson got invited to participate in a curated show at Union College in upstate New York.